Handling a crisis is always hard. Here’s how companies can do better

(CNN)Anyone running a business should be prepared to manage a real crisis at some point. Plan ahead with a crisis team and rehearse the protocols in place. The CEO is not always the best person to lead the team or be the public face of a crisis. Not telling the truth is one of the worst mistakes a company can make. It’s hard to predict when a crisis may strike or how it will come about.It may stemfrom human error, negligence, a bad actor or Mother Nature. And it can take many forms:health and safety issues, fraud, sexual harassment, racism, financial cover-ups, environmental disaster, data breaches, a viral video of an employee mistreating a customer … the list goes on. …

This vending machine can help save the environment — and save you money

In the battle against plastic pollution, Henry Pino has devised a weapon. He calls it the Ecopod, or as he likes to describe it: A vending machine with an environmental conscience. Creating a ‘circular economy’ EcoPod is built upon the circular economy model, which aims to reduce waste by prolonging the use of items like plastic containers by finding ways to refill or reuse them. “I’ve always been in love with the beautiful marine environment that surrounds my home city of Miami,” said Pino, 55. “With the circular economy [model], our goal is to help facilitate a more sustainable retail model that protects the health of our planet.” Susan Collins, president of California-based nonprofit Container Recycling Institute, thinks Ecopod has …

How his grandmother’s hummus recipe is providing relief to refugee children

Ever since he can remember, Anthony Brahimsha would visit his extended family in Aleppo, Syria, at least once a year. During these trips, Brahimsha witnessed children suffering from malnutrition. For the most severely malnourished kids, doctors at the camps wouldadminister a peanut-based high-protein product called Plumpy’Nut. “They would give it once a day for eight weeks. It’s like a superfood with a 99% rehabilitation rate,” said Brahimsha. After he returned home from a trip in 2014, Brahimsha made a decision: he would start a company that would support efforts to help fight malnutrition among refugee children. And that company would sell a food that was close to his own heart — hummus. Plumpy’Nut had triggered a familiar memory in Brahimsha …