Family finds hidden camera livestreaming from their Airbnb in Ireland

(CNN)After arriving at their Airbnb in Cork, Ireland, a family from New Zealand made an unsettling discovery: a hidden camera, livestreaming from the living room. “It was such a shock. It was just a really horrible feeling,” Nealie Barker told CNN. She called Airbnb to report the camera. “They had no advice for us over the phone,” she said. “The girl just said that if you cancel within 14 days, you won’t get your money back.” Next, Andrew Barker called the owner of the property. When confronted with the family’s discovery, Nealie Barker said, the host hung up. Later, he called back, insisting the camera in the living room was the only one in the house. “We didn’t feel relieved …

Paris to fine electric scooter users for pavement riding

Hire companies to be charged annual fee as city predicts massive growth in scooter use Paris plans to regulate the use of electric scooters by introducing fines for riding on the pavement, designated parking spots, and an annual fee for the hire companies. Before national legislation on electric scooters expected this year, the city council voted to impose fines of 135 (115) for riding on the pavement and 35 for blocking the pavement with parked scooters. The city will also remove badly parked scooters. The city council said that while it supported new forms of mobility to replace polluting vehicles, the increasing use of stand-up electric scooters was putting pedestrians at risk, notably older people and infants, while anarchic parking …

Juncker rejects May appeal for further Brexit delay

European commission president insists 12 April ultimate deadline for MPs to pass withdrawal deal Theresa Mays appeal for a short Brexit extension has been rejected by Jean-Claude Juncker, who said that unless the withdrawal deal was passed within nine days the UK would crash out of the EU or have to sign up to a long delay. Less than 24 hours after May had spelled out Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

Brexiters pile on pressure as Mays deal drifts away

High-stakes Chequers summit breaks up without agreement Theresa Mays prospects of getting her Brexit deal through parliament this week dramatically receded on Sunday night after a high-stakes summit with Boris Johnson and other leading hard-Brexiters at her country retreat broke up without agreement. Tory rebels present said that the prime minister repeated all the same lines about her deal and that nothing new emerged during the three-hour meeting, at which Jacob Rees-Mogg, Iain Duncan Smith and Dominic Raab were also present. One source said May was told by some of those present, including Rees-Mogg, that to get her Brexit deal through she needed to spell out when she was quitting No 10 so that another prime minister could lead the …

EU cannot betray ‘increasing majority’ who want UK to remain, says Tusk

EC president hails those who marched against Brexit and revoke article 50 petitioners Donald Tusk has issued a rallying call to the increasing majority of British people who want to cancel Brexit and stay in the EU. In a stirring intervention, the European council president has praised those Guy Verhofstadt compares Nigel Farage to Blackadder character video Tusks comments came as the million people who have signed a UK parliament petition seeking the revocation of article 50. The email informed signatories that this government will not revoke article 50. It went on: Revoking article 50 would break the promises made by government to the British people, disrespect the clear instruction from a democratic vote, and in turn reduce confidence in …

Brexit Q&A: how likely are we to crash out of the EU with no deal?

Possible scenarios range from no deal to Mays deal, Norway plus, second referendum and Mays resignation Are we more or less likely to crash out now without a deal, after the Brexit delay agreed in Brussels? Were much less likely to crash out without a deal next week because the 29 March Brexit deadline has been removed. The government still needs to change the date in the EU Withdrawal Act the central piece of Brexit legislation but it can do that next week with a device called a statutory instrument, which will require a vote in both Houses of Parliament. That is overwhelmingly likely to go through, as only a small number of MPs, perhaps 20 or so, would prefer …

Marseille falls apart: why is France’s second city crumbling?

Marseille is facing its biggest crisis in decades as many of its historic buildings-turned-slums are collapsing, with often tragic results In her flat in a decrepit 18th-century building in the centre of Marseille, Samira ran her hand over a crack in her kitchen wall. I worry my building is slowly caving in, she said. Im scared well end up buried alive. The stone staircase up to other damp apartments was sloping and wonky and residents felt that it moved as they used it. A crack in one wall was so deep, daylight seeped through. A burly teenager on an upper floor had been regularly told by his father not to step on parts of the increasingly uneven kitchen floor, which …

The EUs plan to rein in Facebook and Google will do exactly the opposite | Carlos Fernandes

The proposed shake-up to copyright law will only entrench the dominance of tech giants. There are other, better ways, says Carlos Fernandes The growth of the internet and user-generated content in the past 15 years has been underpinned by speed and ease of use. The foundations for this are commonly referred to as safe harbour provisions in copyright law. This means that organisations that allow users to upload content to their websites Wikipedia, YouTube, Facebook et al are not liable for copyright infringement of their users, but are required to speedily remove content after the fact, if a copyright makes a complaint. Now, through article 13 of its new copyright directive, the EU is curtailing these safe harbour provisions, and …

Banking leak exposes Russian network with link to Prince Charles

Exclusive: investigation reveals how Troika Dialog channelled $4.6bn to Europe and US A charity run by Prince Charles received donations from an offshore company that was used to funnel vast amounts of cash from Russia in a scheme that is under investigation by prosecutors, the Guardian can reveal. Money flowing through the network included cash that can be linked to some of the most notorious frauds committed during Vladimir Putins presidency. In all, it is estimated that $4.6bn (3.5bn) was sent to Europe and the US from a Russian-operated network of 70 offshore companies with accounts in Lithuania. The details have emerged from 1.3m banking transactions obtained by the ed Crime and Corruption Reporting Project and the Lithuanian website Bill …

Concern over food safety as US seeks greater access to UK markets

US sets out aims for post-Brexit trade deal amid fears about chicken and beef standards The US has outlined its objectives for a post-Brexit trade deal with the UK, demanding greater access to the food markets where products such as chlorinated chicken or hormone-fed beef are banned under EU rules. The US laid out its aims for a trade deal to cut tariff and non-tariff barriers for US industrial and agricultural goods and reduce regulatory differences. The Trump administration is seeking to eliminate or reduce barriers for US agricultural products and secure duty-free access for industrial goods. The firm on his position that the UK would not compromise on food standards. He has in the past expressed concern about antibiotics …

Salacious new book says homosexuality is rampant at the Vatican

(CNN)Early in his salacious new book about homosexuality in the Vatican, the French journalist Frederic Martel asks a source to estimate the number of Vatican clergy who are “part of this community, all tendencies included.” While there has been no shortage of sexual scandals in the Catholic Church, mostly concerning the abuse of children, there are no reliable studies on the number of gay Catholics in the priesthood, mostly because church leaders won’t allow them. In that sense, Martel’s book could have provided valuable insights. He says he talked to 1,500 sources, including 41 cardinals, 52 bishops and 45 current and former Vatican ambassadors, or nuncios, during his four years of reporting the book. But is that 80% figure really …